Chittaurgarh Tours Rajasthan

Chitaurgarh, also ChittorChittaur, or Chitorgarh, is a city and a municipality in Rajasthan state of western India. It lies on the Berach river, a tributary of the Banas and is the administrative headquarters of Chittaurgarh District and a former capital of the Sisodia dynasty of Mewar. The city of Chittaurgarh is located on the banks of river Gambhiri and Berach. The Pride and glory of Rajasthan, Chittaur echoes with the tales of romance and valour unique to the Rajput tradition. A ruined citadel, where the royal past lives in its imposing forts, graceful palaces and spectacular chattris. This fortified settlement has been ravaged thrice and each time the outcome was 'Jauhar'-when women and children immolated themselves on a huge funeral pyre while men donned in saffron robes of martyrdom rode out of the fort towards a certain death. Alauddin Khilji was the first to sack Chittaur in 1303 A.D. overpowered by a passionate desire to possess the regal beauty, queen Padmini. Legend has it, that he saw her face in the reflection of a mirror and was struck by her mesmerising beauty. But the noble queen preferred death to dishonour and committed 'Jauhar'.
Vijay Stambh Chittaurgarh Vijay Stambh

History of Chittaurgarh

Chittorgarh is the epitome of Chattari Rajput (a Hindu Kshatriya (Warrior) caste) pride, romance and spirit, for people of Chittor always chose death before surrendering against anyone. It reverberates with history of heroism and sacrifice, which is evident as it echoes with the tales sung by the Bards of Rajasthan. The main reason for visiting Chittorgarh is its massive hilltop fort, the Chittorgarh Fort - the largest fort in India. The fort stands on a 240-hectares site on a 180m high hill that rises rapidly from the plains below.

The Pride and glory of Rajasthan, Chittaur echoes with the tales of romance and valour unique to the Rajput tradition. A ruined citadel, where the royal past lives in its imposing forts, graceful palaces and spectacular chattris. This fortified settlement has been ravaged thrice and each time the outcome was 'Jauhar'-when women and children immolated themselves on a huge funeral pyre while men donned in saffron robes of martyrdom rode out of the fort towards a certain death.
Alauddin Khilji was the first to sack Chittaur in 1303 A.D. overpowered by a passionate desire to possess the regal beauty, queen Padmini. Legend has it, that he saw her face in the reflection of a mirror and was struck by her mesmerising beauty. But the noble queen preferred death to dishonour and committed 'Jauhar'.

In 1533 A.D., during the rule of Bikramjeet, came the second attack from Bahadur Shah, the Sultan of Gujarat. Once again Jauhar was led by Rani Karanavati, a Bundi princess. Her infant son, Udai Singh was smuggled out of Chittaur to Bundi who survived to inherit the throne of the citadel. He learnt from his traumatic childhood that discretion is preferred to valour.

So in, 1567 A.D. when the Mughal Emperor invaded Chittaur, Udai Singh fled to establish a new Capital, Udaipur-a beautiful lake city, leaving behind Chittaur to be defended by two 16 year old heroes, Jaimal of Bednore and Patta of Kelwa. These young men displayed true Rajput chivalry and died after 'Jauhar' was performed. Immediately thereafter Akbar razed the fort to a rubble. The Mughal Emperor Akbar installed their statues in the fort of Agra. Chittaur was never inhabited again but it always asserted the heroic spirit of Rajput warriors.

Places to visit in Chittaurgarh

Rana Kumbha’s Palace Rana Kumbha’s Palace
Vijay Stambh (Victory Tower): The imposing 37 metre high structure with nine storeys, covered with exquisite sculputres of Hindu deities and depicting episodes from the two great epics-Ramayana and Mahabharatha. It was built in 1440 A.D. by Maharana Kumbha, a powerful ruler of Mewar, to commemorate his victory over the Muslim rulers of Malwa and Gujarat.

Rana Kumbha’s Palace: The ruined edifice of great historical and architectural interest, being the most massive monument in the fort of Chittaur. The palace is believed to have underground cellars where Rani Padmini and other women committed Jauhar

Padmini’s Palace:   Built beside a pool, the palace is a magnificent one. It was here that Rana Ratan Singh showed a glimpse of queen Padmini to Alauddin Khilji. Rani Padmini stood in a ‘Zanana Mahal’- a pavilion in the centre and her reflection was visible to Alauddin Khilji in a mirror placed in the main hall. After having a glimpse of the legendary beauty, Alauddin went to the extend ot ravaging Chittaur in order to possess her.

Kumbha Shyam Temple: Built during the region of Rana Kumbha in the Indo-Aryan style, the temple is associated with the mystic poetess Meerabai- an ardent Krishna devotee. She was the wife of Prince Bhojraj.

Kalika Mata Temple: Originally built as a Sun Temple in the 8th century, the temple was later converted into Kalika Mata Temple in the 14th century A.D., dedicated to the mother Goddess Kali- the symbol of power and valour